Oregon Home Health

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Home health care in Oregon

Oregon is known for its beautiful parks and lakes, mountains and forests, and even deserts. You can explore unique scenery that reminds you why you live in the Pacific Northwest. The majestic Crater lake and Mount Hood bring visitors from all over the country. The largest city, Portland, is a hub of culture and food and art as well as Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU); Eugene is home to the University of Oregon; Corvallis is home to Oregon State University. A physician orders home health services. Home health services are unique in comparison with other forms of care and are typically provided after a hospital stay or a skilled rehab stay. The patient may resume normal function around the house after they’ve recovered. Not all health services require around the clock care. Sometimes a loved one may only need help a few days a week.

Looking for health senior health care may seem intimidating. Keep informed of your options.

Definitions of types of care

Home Care: Caregiver assistance related to activities of daily living, including: mobility, eating, toileting, bathing and personal hygiene, dressing and grooming or cognition support. These services are typically not covered by medical insurance and do not require a physician’s order.

Home Health: includes skilled nursing services, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech language therapy and medical social services. A home health care agency may choose to be Medicare certified to be reimbursed for their services. Home health agencies may also teach you how to care for yourself. Services ordered by a physician, covered by Medical Insurance and typically provided following a hospital or skilled rehab stay.

Rehabilitation & Therapy: treatment for an injury, illness, or pain with the goal of restoring function, including nursing and therapy services. Rehab is ordered by
a physician and services are provided by nurses and physical, occupational, and speech therapists. Examples include working with a physical therapist to help you walk and with an occupational therapist to help you get dressed.

Respite Care: short term relief for family caregivers to take a break from the caregiving responsibilities and allows for a healthier and better quality of life for both the caregiver and care receiver. Respite services include: companionship, personal care, recreational activities and security. Respite care can be provided as short stay or for a longer period that allows the family caregiver to go on vacation or a business trip. Longer duration respite care is generally found at select senior housing communities although some Companion services may provide this service in the home.

Hospice Care (Palliative Care): emphasizes comfort measures and counseling to provide social, spiritual and physical support to the dying patient and his or her family. The goals of hospice are to keep the patient as comfortable as possible by relieving pain and other symptoms. Hospice care, is typically offered in the last six months of life and covered under Medicare Part A .

How do I know what care is right for my loved one?

Home Health in Oregon is not Home Care.

Home care professionals assist with activities of daily living (ADLs). These in-home aides may assist with personal care and health monitoring, similar to the care an individual would receive in a long-term facility or community, in the comfort of their own home. This is non-medical care, though caregivers may work with patients to craft a plan to fit their needs.

  • Caregivers assist in activities of daily living (ADLs).  
  • Aides may assist with personal care and monitoring, while patients remain in the comfort of their own home.

Home health differs from these other services in its approach to care.

This level of care is designed for individuals who are ill with a chronic condition and assists in recovery after surgery and other acute health conditions. Home health allows a person to discharge from the hospital earlier and reduce future hospital admissions. Home health is there to assist in faster recovery.

Trained professionals working in home health in Oregon offer a litany of health services:

  • Injections 
  • IV transfusion 
  • Diabetes management 
  • Catheter care 
  • Tracheotomy care 
  • Post-op rehabilitation 

Typically, visits scheduled a few times a week with different disciplines of the home health team.  

The home health team consists of: 

  • Physicians 
  • Nurses 
  • Home health aides 
  • Certified nursing assistants 
  • Physical therapists 
  • Occupational therapists 

Licensing and Regulations for Oregon Hme Health

Licensing and certifications for Home health agencies must be in compliance with Oregon state and local standards. Medicare Part B and the Hospital Insurance Act cover home health services. Agencies must meet certain standards set out by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in order to receive Medicaid and Medicare. A physician and qualified nurses oversee the skilled nurses and the other home health professionals.

How to pay for Home Health and available coverage

Medicare:

Generally Medicare reimburses the cost of Home health services. Medicare typically covers your loved one when recovering from an illness or an accident or a surgery.

*Medicare covers the specific ailment. When treatment is completed Medicare coverage stops. 

Medicare is not a long-term care solution. 

Medicaid:

Medicaid programs are put in place on a state-by-state basis. Each state will have their own regulations regarding the coverage of care. Some individuals at a certain low-income level may qualify for Medicaid Home and Community Based Service Waivers.

Veteran Aid and Attendance:

This benefit is available to some military veterans or surviving spouses. 

  • A veteran may qualify for as much as $2,050 each month. 
  • A veteran with a sick spouse may be eligible for $1,600 per month. 
  • If a veteran has passed, their surviving spouse can qualify for $1,300 per month.

Private Insurance:

  • Most health insurance companies typically cover some services for acute medical needs. 
  • Do be aware, long-term coverage vary by plan. Not all long-term insurance will assist with home health services as the needs of the person tend to be temporary. 

Private pay:

Families which can afford to do so may pay for care with private funds. Private pay can be a combination of retirement funds, personal savings, pension payments and family members may contribute funds toward a loved one’s care as well.

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid serves the public as a trusted partner and steward, dedicated to advancing health equity, expanding coverage, and improving health outcomes. 

Medicaid agencies are available all throughout the United States. Find out if you are eligible with this link.

AARP will provide you with a full list of home health providers in the United States.

Questions and Inquiries about Home Health

  • How long has the agency been serving this community? 
  • Does the agency have any printed brochures describing the services it offers and how much they cost? 
  • Is the agency an approved Medicare provider?
  • Is the agency currently licensed to practice (if required in the state where you live)? 
  • Does a national accrediting body certify the quality of care?  
  • Does the agency offer seniors a “Patients’ Bill of Rights” that describes the rights and responsibilities of both the agency and the senior being cared for? 
  • Is there a care plan in place that outline the patient’s course of treatment, describing the specific tasks to be performed by each caregiver? 
  • How closely do supervisors oversee care to ensure quality? 
  • Will agency caregivers keep family members informed about the kind of care their loved one is getting?
  • Are agency staff members available around the clock, seven days a week, if necessary? 
  • Does the agency have a nursing supervisor available to provide on-call assistance 24 hours a day? 
  • How does the agency ensure patient confidentiality? 
  • How are agency caregivers hired and trained? 
  • What is the procedure for resolving problems when they occur?
  • How does the agency handle billing? 
  • Is there a sliding fee schedule based on ability to pay, and is financial assistance available to pay for services? 
  • Will the agency provide a list of references for its caregivers? 
  • Who does the agency call if the home health care worker cannot come when scheduled? 
  • What type of employee screening is done? 

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Care Availability

Care Availability

Written by The Care Availability Team
Experts in the senior care & retirement living industries

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